Supervision and Training

Is it theoretically and practically relevant and will they treat me respectfully?

Another new year has begun and time to set goals for 2019. Will it be a fitness programme, a resolution to spend more time with family, a better work-life balance or decision to improve professional skills? If the decision is to undertake training to achieve this goal the next question is how to choose a course that suits and will deliver the benefits sought.

Identification of the most and least useful learning experiences in marriage and family therapy training was addressed by Piercy, Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy at Virginia Tech and his colleagues. Using the critical incident technique which reflects real world events rather than abstractions and thematic analysis where researchers identify and analyse patterns within a qualitative data set, the authors surveyed 68 graduate students. A strong connection between theory and practice appeared to underpin student satisfaction and a view of the learning experience as more meaningful. The relationship between student and teacher is also important with a collaborative, respectful and supportive teacher who valued their students input and opinions contributing to a positive learning experience. The authors conclude with a list of seven suggestions based on their research to guide teachers and supervisors to create the most positive environment to acquire new skills for students at every level.

Most and Least Meaningful Learning Experiences In Marriage And Family Therapy (2016)
Education Fred P. Piercy, RyanM. Earl, Renu K. Aldrich, Hoa N. Nguyen, Sarah M. Steelman, Emily Haugen, Dana Riger, Ruvi T. Tsokodayi, Jamie West, Yesim Keskin, and Emily Gary
Journal of Marital and Family Therapy 42(4): 584–598